Isfahan Bridges

Isfahan BridgesReviewed by mohsen panahi on Oct 4Rating: 4.5

isfahan bridges

Isfahan Bridges

Isfahan is located in the heart of Iran where is surrounded by the two main deserts . you can not expect plenty sources of water in this part of Iran . but there is river names Zayande roud ( means life producer ) which is floating through the city of Isfahan and in fact is the main reason of building this city & its civilization . through the centuries Isfahani artists flourished their art in constructing so many eye catching bridges to link the two part of the city in different areas with different purposes . now the bridges are the main touristy attractions in Isfahan . as below we name some of the main bridges & a short history of them .

 

Siosepol

Siosepol or Siose Bridge which means 33 Bridge or the Bridge of 33 Arches, also called the Allah-Verdi Khan Bridge, is one of the eleven bridges of Isfahan, Iran and the longest bridge on Zayandeh River with the total length of 297.76 metres (976.9 ft). It is highly ranked as being one of the most famous examples of Safavid bridge design.

Other names for the bridge include “The Bridge of 33 Springs”, “The Bridge of Chaharbagh”, and finally “Zayandeh River Bridge”.

 

Khaju Bridge

Khaju Bridge is arguably the finest bridge in the province of Isfahan, Iran. It was built by the Persian Safavid king, Shah Abbas II around 1650 C.E., on the foundations of an older bridge. Serving as both a bridge, and a dam (or a weir), it links the Khaju quarter on the north bank with the Zoroastrian quarter across the Zayandeh River.

Joubi Bridge

Joui Bridge , also called the Choobi Bridge, is a bridge in Isfahan, Iran. It was built in 1665, during the Safavid era.

The Joui Bridge is located between Khaju and Ferdowsi bridges. It is 147 meters long and 4 meters wide, with 21 arches. It was built during the reign of Shah Abbas II to irrigate and inter-relate the kings gardens on both sides of the river. The bridge and the two parlours within were for the exclusive use of the shah and his courtiers. Nowadays the parlours are being used as tea houses.

 

 

 

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